Making the Online Botanic Gardens Station Model (Part 1: The Model)

One of my “fun projects” this year has been to make an interactive model of the abandoned Botanic Gardens Station in Glasgow. Although I’ve dabbled in 3D modelling before, including making a documentary video about Scotland Street Tunnel last year, the Botanics project turned out to be by far the most complicated 3D thing I’ve made, as well as by far the most complicated bit of web coding to make a viewer for it. It’s been a lot of fun as well as a hell of a learning experience, so I thought I’d write it up here in case anyone is interested.

The finished model, viewed in Chrome for Linux

The finished model, viewed in Chrome for Linux

In Part 1, I’ll talk about making the actual 3D model. Part 2 will cover the viewer code that actually makes it possible to explore the model from the comfort of your web browser.

I made the station model using Blender, a very capable free, open source 3D package. While various software and hardware now exists that allows you to generate a 3D model automatically from photographs or video, I didn’t have access to or knowledge of it, and I’m not sure how well it would work in a confined and oddly shaped space like the Botanic Gardens Station anyway. So I did it the old fashioned way instead, using the photos I took when I explored the station as a reference and crafting the 3D model to match using Blender’s extensive modelling tools.

The whole model in Blender

The whole model in Blender

I tried to keep the dimensions as close to reality as I could, using one grid square in Blender per metre, referring to the published sizes of the station and tunnels where possible, and estimating the scale of everything else as best I could.

It was actually surprisingly easy and quick to throw together a rough model of the station itself – most of the elements (the platforms, stairs, walls, roof, etc.) are made up of fairly simple geometric shapes and I had the basic structure there within a couple of hours. But as with a lot of these things, the devil is in the details and I spent countless more hours refining it and adding the trickier bits.

The beginnings of the station model

The beginnings of the station model

Because there’s quite a lot of repetition and symmetry in the station design, I was able to make use of some of Blender’s modifiers to massively simplify the task. The mirror modifier can beĀ used for items that are symmetrical, allowing you to model only one side of something and have the mirror image of it magically appear for the other side. (In fact, apart from the roof the station is almost completely symmetrical, which saved me a lot of modelling time and effort). The array modifier is even more powerful: it can replicate a single model any number of times in any direction, which allowed me to model a single short section of roof or tunnel or wall and then have it stretch away into the distance with just a few clicks.

Tunnel, modelled with array modifier

Tunnel, modelled with array modifier

Finally, the curve modifier was very valuable. The entire station (and much of the surrounding tunnel) is built on a slight curve, which would be a nightmare to model directly. But thanks to the curve modifier, I was able to model the station and tunnels as if they were completely straight, and then add the curve as a final step, which was much easier. (I still don’t find the curve modifier very intuitive; it took quite a lot of playing around and reading tutorials online to get the effect I wanted, and even now I don’t fully understand how I did it. But the important thing is, it works!).

Tunnel + curve modifier = curving tunnel

Tunnel + curve modifier = curving tunnel

Texturing the model (that is, applying the images that are “pasted onto” the 3D surfaces to add details and make them look more realistic) turned out to be at least as tricky as getting the actual geometry right. The textures had been a major weak point of my Scotland Street model and I wanted much better ones for the Botanics. Eventually I discovered the great texture resource at textures.com, which had high quality images for almost everything I needed, and under a license that allowed me to do what I wanted with them – this is where most of the textures for the model came from. The remainder are either hand drawn (the graffiti), extracted from my photos (the tunnel portal exteriors and the calcite), or generated by a program I wrote a while ago when I was experimenting with Perlin Noise (some of the rusted metal).

The fiddly part was assigning texture co-ordinates to all the vertices in the model. I quickly discovered that it would have been much easier to do this as I went along, rather than completing all the geometry first and then going back to add textures later on (especially where I’d “applied” array modifiers, meaning that I now had to assign texture co-ordinates individually for each copy of the geometry instead of just doing it once). Lesson learned for next time. At first I found this stage of the process really difficult, but by the time I’d textured most of the model I was getting a much better feel for how it should be done.

The model in Blender, with textures applied

The model in Blender, with textures applied

(The trees and bushes weren’t in fact modelled using Blender… more about them next time!).

 

One thought on “Making the Online Botanic Gardens Station Model (Part 1: The Model)

  1. Pingback: Making the Online Botanic Gardens Station Model (Part 2: The Viewer) | GCat's World of Stuff

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